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In the second of this three part discussion on emerging trends in design, I discuss Design for Good, the AIGA initiative to activate design-driven social change with Michelle Ronsen of Academy of Art University in San Francisco.

Academy of Art University interview, part 2 from Doug Powell on Vimeo.

I originally met designer Michele Ronsen at the AIGA Business Perspectives for Creative Leaders program in 2007 when the program was still in its original home at Harvard Business School (now at Yale School of Management). We hit it off back then and have continued an ongoing dialogue about various design-related issues. Last spring, while on a visit to San Francisco, I stopped by the Academy of Art University (where Michele teaches in the graduate design program) to discuss the emerging trend of design-driven social change. This video is part 1 in a 3-part series.

The AIGA Gain Conference was held October 8-9 in San Francisco. This year, the conference had a theme of Design for Social Value and featured speakers such as Emily Pilloton, Robert Fabricant, and Ravi Naidoo. It was an invigorating two days of challenging and inspiring discussions that illuminated the possibilities and challenges that lay before the design community as we venture into new territory. Here are my opening remarks for the conference.

My name is Doug Powell. I’m a designer and the national president of AIGA. It is my great pleasure to welcome you to the 2012 AIGA Gain Conference. The Gain Conference has its roots right here in San Francisco and, in fact, right here at the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts. In the year 2000, the AIGA Risk/Reward conference, which two years later became the Gain conference, was held here. 

Risk/Reward was a bold move for AIGA at the time because, rather than celebrating design excellence in the purely aesthetic way we had come to expect it, Risk/Reward challenged the audience to consider the many influential factors–in addition to aesthetics–that made designers successful. At the turn of the millennium, as the profession and practice of design was hitting its stride in new ways, the bold move of Risk/Reward was perfectly timed. The proof of this lay in the subsequent five Gain Business of Design conferences, which became one of the most popular AIGA programs.

Twelve years later designers have found profound new ways to influence the world around them bringing the process of design to complex social problems on the local, regional, and global scale. Designers are having a major impact on issues such as healthcare, sustainability, and education, issues once the proprietary domain of academics, policy makers, and business leaders. 

AIGA members in our 66 local chapters and more than 200 student groups are among the leaders in this new movement initiating change-oriented projects and programs in communities as diverse as Brooklyn, Birmingham, and Johannesburg, South Africa. In response to this groundswell of member activity, one year ago AIGA launched Design for Good our initiative to ignite, amplify, and accelerate design-driven social change. As the profession and practice of design once again turned an exciting and challenging new corner, it was time for another bold move. So to punctuate the successful first year of Design for Good we have returned to San Francisco and returned to Yerba Buena to once again ask important questions about the new ways in which designers are working.

Let me make one thing very clear: this Gain conference will not be simply a pep rally for social design, although I suspect and hope that we will all be sufficiently inspired by what we will experience over the next two days. This conference must reach beyond the motivational and begin to ask the tough questions that will be required in order for design-driven social change to become an embedded, sustained, and meaningful effort, not just a short-lived trend.

These questions include: What are the new models for a design practice that will enable this work? What are the sources for funding, and how do we access them? Who are the established individuals and organizations we should be aligning ourselves with? How do we measure the effectiveness of our work in a way that will resonate with our new partners? And what skills will designers need to acquire in order to function effectively in this new role as change agents?

 To address these questions, we have assembled a roster of the early leaders in this emerging practice area representing a diverse range of business settings, geographic regions, and philosophical points of view. Our goal is not to provide answers, but to provoke more questions, to ignite conversations and connections, and ultimately to inspire you all to return to your own communities better armed, informed and prepared to make a positive difference.

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